IDA problem

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martinmasanes
Posts: 38
Joined: Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:39 pm
Location: universidad de los andes

IDA problem

Post by martinmasanes » Thu May 08, 2014 7:36 am

Dear all
I'm performing an IDA analysis but got a problem: Even scaling the ground motion to high values, the plot of Drift vs Sa(T1) remains practically linear, so I doen't get an 'infinite drift' to define the collapse.
The pushover curve is fine, it have a yielding point and after it, it have a segment of negative slope, so I think the model has no problems, please help.

fmk
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Re: IDA problem

Post by fmk » Thu May 08, 2014 4:07 pm

what is happening to the roof displacements as you increase the amplitude, i.e. are you hitting the yield points? and can you get infinite drift with the model you are using??

martinmasanes
Posts: 38
Joined: Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:39 pm
Location: universidad de los andes

Re: IDA problem

Post by martinmasanes » Fri May 09, 2014 6:26 am

Yes, I'm sure I'm reaching the yield point int the roof displacement I'm not sure if I can answer the seccond question. Now I'm trying changing the geom. transformation from PDelta in beams and columns (Corotational in braces) to all Corotational for a scale grater than Sa=1.5 g. In don't know if I can reach infinite Drift with this parameters (and delta t=0.001 seconds):
constraints Plain
numberer RCM
system UmfPack
test RelativeNormDispIncr 1.0e-4 30
algorithm NewtonLineSearch -type Secant
integrator Newmark 0.5 0.25
analysis Transient

Thanks for your help

cxqiu
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Mar 18, 2013 7:33 am

Re: IDA problem

Post by cxqiu » Thu May 15, 2014 11:08 pm

Hi, it is not easy to figure out the reason since we don't see the modeling information. But I suggest you to try more ground motion records. btw, I guess Sa=1.5g is not so large that it can collapse a structure.
PhD Candidate;
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

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